PADI Speciality Dive Courses

Here follows a list of the PADI Speciality Dive courses that we offer in Waterworld.
PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider
Oxygen, water, and food are fundamentally important to all animals. Of these three basic essentials for the maintenance of life, the lack of oxygen leads to death most rapidly. First aid with emergency oxygen is useful or necessary as a treatment for many injuries, diseases and intoxications that interfere with oxygen reaching the blood or tissues. For recreational scuba divers, emergency oxygen is the primary first aid given to individuals suffering from a near drowning or decompression illness (lung overexpansion injuries and decompression sickness). Providing emergency oxygen has become the standard of practice for treating injured scuba divers since it provides oxygen to starved tissues and aids in bubble reduction. Having emergency oxygen immediately available at dive locations is especially important to divers suffering from these maladies. Along with the availability of oxygen at dive sites, first responders must know how to provide oxygen in an emergency. It is the goal of this course to train all divers (PADI Junior Open Water Divers and above) and those in a position to help divers (boat captains, lifeguards, etc.) in the proper use of emergency oxygen. This entry-level emergency oxygen course also teaches the recognition of diving illnesses treatable by emergency oxygen, but the specific details of dive accident response and management are left to the PADI
Rescue Diver course. The PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider Specialty course may be used as an enhanced substitute for the emergency oxygen training provided in the PADI Rescue Diver course.
Prerequisites – None
Minimum Age – None
Dives – None
price on application

PADI Altitude
The world’s mountain ranges are synonymous with sport, adventure and recreation. Thoughts of fresh mountain air, sheer rock faces, icy brooks and deep-blue skies conjure images of the Rockies, the Andes, the Alps and other ranges – places to escape civilization, taste excitement or just commune with nature. It’s no surprise, then, that those headed up into unspoiled heights include scuba divers. Fresh water mountain lakes are often cool, clean and clear, with interesting aquatic life. The goal of this course is to serve as an introduction to altitude diving and help you to develop the necessary altitude diving skills, knowledge and techniques. Students should be able to safely plan, organize and execute no decompression dives at altitudes up to 3000 metres/10,000 feet. Students apply altitude diving knowledge and skills during actual open water dives. The course philosophy therefore, is to expand student diver knowledge about altitude diving and decompression theory, altitude diving physiology, altitude diving equipment considerations, and, using the recreational dive planner at altitude. Once learned, student divers apply the knowledge by making at least two open water dives practicing and demonstrating the practical aspects of altitude diving.
We do our Altitude dive on the Connor Pass in Peddlers Lake. This dive has a 50 meter hike up the mountain with gear, so a certain level of fitness is required for this course.
Prerequisites Minimum Age 10 years
Site, Depths For the purpose of training, altitude is defined as ranging from 300 to 3,000metres/1000 to 10,000 feet above sea level.
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2
price on application

PADI Fish Identification
This course is designed to introduce divers to the most common families and species of fish found in temperate and tropical waters. Divers learn basic fish identification and scientific surveying techniques. Through an overview of Project AWARE and other preservation and research efforts, such as the REEF Fish Survey Project, divers also learn the importance of personal involvement in aquatic environment conservation.
Prerequisite Certification: PADI Open Water Diver, Junior Open Water Diver or qualifying certification
Minimum Age: 10
Minimum Open Water Training: 2 dives
price on application

PADI Digital Underwater Photography
The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer course is a two-part (Level One and Level Two) introduction to digital underwater photography centred on today’s point-and-shoot digital cameras. The course helps student divers develop the knowledge, skills and practical techniques necessary to obtain excellent photographs with a digital camera, even on their first photo dive. It is a materials-driven course intended for a broad audience – snorkelers, Discover Scuba Diving participants*, Open Water Diver students* and certified divers. The course is primarily for those interested in learning the basics of digital underwater photography. Level One of the course guides students in achieving good results easily, even if they’ve never used a digital camera before. It is designed as an introduction to course skills and knowledge. In Level One, students learn what equipment they need to take great underwater photographs, how to prepare their underwater photo system, and basic underwater photo techniques while diving in an environmentally friendly manner. Level One training is open to snorkelers, Open Water Diver students* and certified divers. Students who successfully complete Level One may receive a PADI certification card. You may conduct Level One skill development in a pool/confined water or in open water. After students successfully complete Level One, they may move on to Level Two to learn how to make their photographs even better. Level Two expands what they need to know about file formats, resolution settings, making their images lighter or darker, getting good colour, composing their photo, downloading photographs into their computer and adjusting them to look their best. Level Two training is open to snorkelers and certified divers.
Prerequisites
1. Be certified as a PADI Open Water Diver, PADI Junior Open Water Diver or have a qualifying
Certification from another training organization or be a snorkeler.
Minimum Age: 5 years old.
price on application

PADI Diver Propulsion price on applicationVehicle
Underwater scooters are both practical – for a given dive duration, you see a wider area because you travel faster and cover more ground – and it’s fun – the DPV does much of the work for you; it reduces your exertion and air consumption. In fact, the better DPVs perform the more fun they are and the more useful they are. The only downside to DPVs is that once you start using them, you’ll want to have one all the time! Keeping that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on extending the adventure – going further, staying longer, and seeing more – on all your dives with an underwater propulsion vehicle.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 12 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2
price on application

PADI Drift Diver
Drift diving is a relaxing and enjoyable form of diving that offers an alternative to using lines and other techniques to move against current. It is especially suited to areas with mild to strong current with long reefs, kelp forests or other topography within recreational depth limits. The current allows the diver to see more aquatic life and underwater formations than usual. However, drift diving is often performed more for the experience of underwater flight than for sightseeing.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 12 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2
price on application

PADI Dry Suit Diver
Why dive dry – simply to stay warm. No one said diving had to be cold or wet. Diving dry is the difference between withstanding the 4°C temperature of some waters to enjoy watching a three-inch scallop’s beadlike eyes spangles the edges of a brightly coloured mantle. It is the difference in witnessing the powerful jaws and massive grinding teeth in a mouth of a wolf eel, hovering-by as a giant octopus propels itself by jetting water past its eight sucker-covered arms, or simply not diving at all. More often than not, in colder waters, dry suit diving can be the difference between experiencing multiple dives in one day or making one chilly wet suit dive and listening to others tell you about what you’ve missed on the dives you were just too cold to make. With this in mind, the philosophy of this course is to focus on comfort diving in a dry suit. Thus, the goal of this course is to show student divers how to consider all factors when comfort diving in a dry suit. The course covers everything from choices of dry suit materials, techniques for controlling buoyancy above and underwater, dressing into and out of a dry suit, to maintenance and repair concerns. Student divers learn to use the most effective and efficient means to extend their underwater adventure into cold water without getting cold or wet.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 10 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2
price on application

PADI Underwater Navigator
Early Polynesian navigators routinely crossed thousands of miles of open ocean in outrigger canoes, using only their own senses and knowledge, a tradition passed down from generation to generation. These early peoples used natural navigation clues such as the motion of specific stars, weather, wildlife species, and directions of swells on the ocean, colours of the sea and sky and angles of approaching harbours to navigate their way from point A to point B on the ocean’s surface. Today, we still use natural navigation clues to navigate above and below the water, but the invention of the compass and other navigational instruments makes navigation a much easier albeit still a very challenging task. Despite more than an hour underwater and covering a lot of ground, scuba divers can successfully reach their intended mark by integrating natural navigation techniques (environmental observation) and their skill of using instruments like the compass. Whether your first navigation dive or your hundredth, few moments in diving compare with the satisfaction and pride you feel when you navigate a distance or specific navigation pattern and hit your mark dead-on. Keep that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on fun and challenging underwater navigation dives with an emphasis on safety. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach you a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying underwater navigation. You will develop the techniques involved in navigating underwater within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 10 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 3
price on application

PADI Project Aware
The Project AWARE Specialty program is a nondiving program designed to familiarize divers and no divers with the plight of aquatic ecosystems around the world. It also describes what individuals can do to help protect aquatic resources. Thus, the goals of this course are to familiarize participants with:
• The role Project AWARE Foundation plays in protecting aquatic ecosystems worldwide.
• The importance, and the interdependent nature, of aquatic ecosystems.
• The pertinent issues concerning the environmental status of underwater environments, such as pollution, fisheries and coastal zone management.
• Information needed to take specific actions to help conserve underwater environments.
Prerequisites Interest in the aquatic world
Minimum Age None
Dives – None
price on application

PADI Deep Diver
It’s a rare diver who hasn’t felt the urge to dive deep. Deep diving opens the door to many new exciting dive sites like deeper wrecks, reefs and walls. As a rule, divers tend to be adventurous people, and deep diving – whether to visit a wreck or take photos – can certainly be called adventurous. It’s only natural that like most divers, you have some interest in deep diving. Deep diving is a means to an end. You make a deep dive to see, to do or to experience something that you can’t on a shallower dive. There’s no reason to make a deep dive if you can make essentially the same dive at a shallower depth. Unlike shallower dives, deep dives tend to be short since time and air supply is limited. Therefore, you don’t have a great deal of time to do much so you’ll need to make smart decisions about a dive objective and dive accomplishments. Keep that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on making smart decisions for a stress free, deep diving experience with an emphasis on safety. Thus, the goal of this course is to bring to light the necessary equipment needed to support deep diving activities, to discourage thrill seeker attitudes and encourage the proper deep diver behaviour of following appropriate limits, and to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying deep diving. Student divers will develop the techniques involved in deep diving within recreational limits (between the depths of 18 metres/60 feet and 40 metres/130 feet) while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life.
Prerequisites PADI Adventure Diver or Advanced Open WaterDiver
Minimum Age 15 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 4 dives over 2 days
price on application

PADI Enriched Air Diver
This course is designed to qualify recreational divers to use enriched air (“nitrox”) for no
stop recreational diving. The program addresses the use of enriched air with 22 percent to
40 percent oxygen, with emphasis on enriched air with 32 and 36 percent oxygen.
The PADI Enriched Air Diver course emphasizes the theoretical and operational considerations
involved with enriched air diving. Mastery of the learning objectives is demonstrated
during knowledge development assessment, practical application sessions and
open water dives.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 12 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2 (Optional)
price on application

PADI Search & Recovery
Many factors can affect the success or failure of any search and recovery conducted underwater. Those of particular importance are surface conditions, underwater visibility, depth, bottom topography, bottom composition, vegetation, accessibility, surge, tides, currents, accuracy of bearings, water temperature, pollution, and obstacles or hazards. The size, weight, and dimensions of the object to recover also play a huge role. The search and recovery dive team cannot control these factors. There is, in fact, one aspect of an underwater search and recovery that can be controlled – organization. The other factors must be considered when the team plans a search and recovery, altering how they search and the recovery methods to accommodate them. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to the search and recovery of submerged objects. Student divers will develop the techniques involved in locating and retrieving lost articles, large and small, within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life. The mechanics of the search are truly an art; while the principles applied to the operation are firmly grounded in science. The best way to learn how to conduct search patterns and to use lifting devices is by doing it.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Advanced Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 12 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 4 dives over 2 days
price on application

PADI Wreck Diver
Diving through 9 metres/30 feet, then 12 metres/40 feet, 15 metres/50 feet, and finally 18 metres/60 feet of silty azure blue salt water, you see her lying there like a wounded bird, one of her wings fractured and one of her engines gone. Did enemy fighters blow away her engine? Was its loss plunge her from the tropical sky more than 40 years ago? She was a B-25, an Allied workhorse of World War II in the Pacific. You don’t have to stretch your imagination too far to see her in her original state, ready to fight again. Her crumpled nose houses two machine guns – still stacked with bullets – now covered with hard coral, algae, and crimson red gorgonians. The cockpit escape hatch sits open, slid back as it had been on that fateful day in 1943. It was clear to see that the pilot had cleverly ditched his bomber in a narrow shallow strait between Wongat Island and mainland New Guinea. Did the crew swim to the island? Did Japanese forces capture them? How old were these men? Twenty? Twenty-one? You watch as parrotfish dine on a coral incrusted machine-gun barrel. Two angelfish casually glide through the bomb bay doors while translucent shrimp dance their way over the rusty face of the altimeter gauge. Diving on wrecks appeals to most divers, though for many different reasons. You may find yourself attracted to the challenge of exploring the wreck, or a fascination with its historical nature. Underwater photographers love wrecks for their picture potential, while those interested in nature like the fact that wrecks quickly become artificial reefs. Wrecks are typically ships, but can include railroad cars, aircraft and automobiles. In these, you’ll find wreck sites range from those open to novice to those only accessible by the most experienced technical divers. Whether your first or your hundredth dive on a wreck, few moments in diving compare with descending on the past. Keep that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on fun, safe wreck diving. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying wreck diving. Student divers will develop the techniques involved in wreck diving within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life. The best way to learn wreck diving procedures and to apply them is by doing it. This course philosophy therefore, expands student diver knowledge about wreck diving law, hazards to avoid, how to research wrecks, wreck diving equipment, the basics of penetrating a wreck and how to interact responsibly with the aquatic life they’ll see while wreck diving. Student divers will apply the knowledge they gain by reading the PADI Wreck Diver Manual and watching the companion video on at least four open water dives practicing and demonstrating the practical aspects of wreck diving
Prerequisites PADI Adventure Diver
Minimum Age 15 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 4 dives over 2 daysprice on application

PADI Boat Diver
Boats allow you to explore spectacular dive sites not easily accessible from shore. Imagine no
entries through surf, no long surface swims, no navigational wizardry to find the site, and no air gone from your cylinder to arrive at the reef you wanted to explore. Instead, imagine effortlessly entering the water from the transom of a boat – in moments, you and your buddy descend to the site, eyes wide open in anticipation of the aquatic marine life you’ll see. Imagine diving visibility averaging 30-45 metres/100-150 feet, wrecks teeming with life, common encounters
with sea lions, octopus, and giant kelp canopies that are home to a vast variety of reef fish, lingcod, urchins, strawberry anemones, crabs and lobsters. Combine the comfort and ease of diving from a boat and your closest diving friends, and you have all the makings for a perfect scuba experience Experiences like these attract divers to boat diving; in fact, whether your first or your hundredth dive, virtually all divers end up diving from a boat eventually. Diving and boats make an obvious match. Although there are great dive sites available from shore, some of the world’s best diving is accessible only from a boat. With this in mind, the philosophy of this course is to focus on the comfort and ease of diving from a boat. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying boat diving. Student divers will develop the techniques involved in boat diving within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life. The best way to learn boat diving procedures and to apply them is by doing it. This course philosophy therefore, expands student diver knowledge about the advantages of boat diving, boat terminology, types of dive boats, basic rules of the road, safety equipment for boat diving, boat diving procedures and etiquette, and the basic guides to boating safety. Student divers will apply the knowledge they gain by reading the PADI Boat Diver Manual, watching the PADI Boat Diving
video, and on at least two open water dives practicing and demonstrating the practical aspects of boat diving.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 10 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2
price on application

PADI Underwater Naturalist
The PADI Underwater Naturalist course is designed to help student divers to interact with the living underwater world based on objective assessments and observations. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers to view the aquatic ecosystems scientifically, without biases based on misconceptions and myths. Student divers learn basic organism groupings and identification, but the emphasis is placed on student diver understandings of the relationships between organisms, their environment and humans, as well as on the application of environmentally friendly dive techniques. While the Underwater Naturalist course has a significant amount of knowledge development, as with other PADI programs, the course philosophy is to apply this knowledge and practice related techniques actually diving. With this in mind, the philosophy of this course is to focus on demonstrating responsible interactions with the living environment. This course therefore, involves student divers in the planning, organization, procedures, techniques and problems of diving in different aquatic environments. Student divers apply the knowledge they gain by reading the PADI Underwater Naturalist Manual and by completing at least two open water dives practicing and demonstrating the practical aspects of being an underwater naturalist.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age 10 years
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2
price on application

PADI Multilevel Diver
In the early days of diving, recreational dive time underwater was defined as the no decompression limit of the deepest depth reached. Today, multilevel diving – gaining more no decompression time by ascending to shallower depths where nitrogen absorption is slower – is more the rule than the exception. Thanks to recreational multilevel diving, in most environments you can stay underwater as long as you have air and warmth. This advantage is made possible thanks to advances in decompression theory as used in the eRDPML distributed by PADI, and modern dive computers. Whether your students favour coral reefs or inland lakes, most dive sites have opportunities to multilevel dive. Any place your students can find a sloping reef, wall or other topography that allows them to start deep and move to shallower depth, they can plan a multilevel dive with the eRDPML or a dive computer. Therefore the philosophy of this course is to focus on extending your students time underwater by teaching them accepted multilevel techniques and procedures. The goal of this course is to serve as an introduction to multilevel diving and help the student diver develop the necessary multilevel skills, knowledge and techniques. Students apply multilevel knowledge and skills during actual open water dives. The course philosophy therefore, is to expand student diver knowledge about decompression theory, ascent procedures, choosing and using dive computers, decompression sickness, and multilevel equipment, hazards and planning. Once learned, student divers apply the knowledge by making at least two open water dives practicing and demonstrating the practical aspects of multilevel diving.
Prerequisites PADI (Junior) Open Water Diver
Minimum Age Years 12
Minimum Open Water Dives: 2 Dives
price on application

PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy
The purpose of the PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty course is to
polish a diver’s buoyancy control beyond the Open Water Diver level. The goal
of PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy training is to enhance the student diver
diver’s buoyancy control abilities through knowledge development and practical
skills practice.
Prerequisite Certification: PADI Open Water Diver, Junior Open
Water Diver or qualifying certification
Minimum Age: 10
Minimum Open Water Training: 2 dives
price on application

PADI Instructor Specialities
PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider
PADI Altitude
PADI Fish Identification
PADI Digital Underwater Photography
PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy
PADI Underwater Photographer
PADI Underwater Naturalist
PADI Boat Diver
PADI Multilevel Diver
PADI Deep diver
PADI Enriched Air
PADI Night Diver
PADI Search & Recovery
PADI Wreck Trainer
PADI Diver Propulsion Vehicle
PADI Drift
PADI Dry Suit
PADI Underwater Navigator
PADI Underwater Videographer

Please contact Sandra to book Instructor Specialities.